Lunchtime doubly so.

Spelunking the depths of Popular Culture
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  • It has been said of the Iliad that anyone who starts reading it as history will find that it is full of fiction but, equally, anyone who starts reading it as fiction will find that it is full of history.

    Arnold Toynbee (via historical-nonfiction)

    (Source: futilitycloset.com, via historical-nonfiction)

    ourpresidents:

Astronomy Day is tomorrow, May 10—
Here’s President Hoover and his White House secretary, Larry Richey, watching an eclipse of the sun on August 31, 1932.
-from the Hoover Library

    ourpresidents:

    Astronomy Day is tomorrow, May 10—

    Here’s President Hoover and his White House secretary, Larry Richey, watching an eclipse of the sun on August 31, 1932.

    -from the Hoover Library

    chipteret:

A postcard showing Boston’s Old City Hall on School Street
Postmarked December 18, 1913

    chipteret:

    A postcard showing Boston’s Old City Hall on School Street

    Postmarked December 18, 1913

    acollectedgentleman:

Good Morning 
Beautiful People 

    acollectedgentleman:

    Good Morning 

    Beautiful People 

    whataboutbobbed:

    Denishawn Dance company founder Ruth St Denis and husband Ted Shawn with garden party guests, including Louise Brooks and Martha Graham

    previously with Louise and the Denishawn Dancers

    historical-nonfiction:

    No African-American artist topped the US Billboard Chart in 2013 — the first time this has happened in 55 years

    (Source: TIME)

    dekutree:

    howtobeafuckinglady:

    FUCK I JUST WOKE UP MY ENTIRE HOUSE

    harrison ford deserves every single oscar for this one scene

    (Source: naturemetaltolkien, via abackwaterprincess)

    "…And the Pips!" from The Richard Pryor Special? (1977)

    From the special that spawned Richard Pryor’s four episode television series, which was nearly cancelled before it aired.

    celluloidfire:

Bertie Flirt.
Jeeves and Wooster S01E01: “Jeeves Takes Charge”
(The scenes that I grabbed today equal 10,500 individual frames to be giffed. That’s a lot. I’m tired. Here’s a present.)

    celluloidfire:

    Bertie Flirt.

    Jeeves and Wooster S01E01: “Jeeves Takes Charge”

    (The scenes that I grabbed today equal 10,500 individual frames to be giffed. That’s a lot. I’m tired. Here’s a present.)

    No doubt it is true that there is more rejoicing in heaven over one sinner repented than over all the saints who consistently remain holy, and the rare, sudden gentleness of arrogant people have infinitely more effect than the continual gentleness of gentle people.

    The Magnificent Ambersons by Booth Tarkington

    Studying For Funsies - CARRIAGES

    18thcenturylove:

    Sooo like a true history peep, I take notes on random bits of historical history. This week, carriages! :D (forgive me if I made a mistake!)

    BAROUCHE

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    BERLINE

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    CABRIOLET

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    CALASH (also name for folding top on BAROUCHE, CHAISE and VICTORIA)

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    CHAISE (CHAY, SHAY)

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    CURRICLE (TYPE OF CHAISE)

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    COUPE

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    No roof for driver = COUPE DE-VILLE
    Coupé de-ville with folding top = LANDAU
    Coupé de-ville with folding top over passenger =LANDAULET

    DILIGENCE

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    HANSOM (BASED ON CABRIOLET, A TYPE OF “FLY”)

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    - "Fly" = A cab (short for cabriolet) for hire, hansom replaced hackney
    - A hackney of a more expensive or high class was called a REMISE

    OMNIBUS

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    PHAETON

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    VICTORIA (PHAETON BUT CLASSIER)

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    nitratediva:

Maureen O’Hara in The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939).

    nitratediva:

    Maureen O’Hara in The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939).

    (via adefaultsmile)

    Do books matter? Do they change minds — or do we just read into them whatever we want to know? We live in the most literate age in human history, yet many people today find few things less useful than books, and no books as useless as those of the philosophers. Many scholars today take for granted that philosophy is a technical discipline concerned with questions that can make sense only to a cadre of professionals trained to a perfection of irrelevance. The wider public, meanwhile, tends to think of philosophy as a place to stash all the questions that well up wherever our knowledge runs completely dry: the meaning of life, why there is something rather than nothing, the existence of the supernatural, and all that. Of the many attributes that seem to mark America’s Founders as residents of a foreign time and place, probably none is more astonishing today than their unapologetic confidence in the power of books — and in particular the books of the philosophers.

    Matthew Stewart, Nature’s God: The Heretical Origins of the American Republic (BOOK | KINDLE)

    (Source: deadpresidents)