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Spelunking the depths of Popular Culture
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  • retrocampaigns:

Teddy Roosevelt on the campaign trail in Boston in 1912.  Courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection. Check out more pics in the awesome Presidents set.

    retrocampaigns:

    Teddy Roosevelt on the campaign trail in Boston in 1912.

    Courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection. Check out more pics in the awesome Presidents set.

    (via retrocampaigns)

    americanrepublic:

Old IronsidesOliver Wendell HolmesAy, tear her tattered ensign down!Long has it waved on high,And many an eye has danced to seeThat banner in the sky;Beneath it rung the battle shout,And burst the cannon’s roar;—The meteor of the ocean airShall sweep the clouds no more.Her deck, once red with heroes’ blood,Where knelt the vanquished foe,When winds were hurrying o’er the flood,And waves were white below,No more shall feel the victor’s tread,Or know the conquered knee;—The harpies of the shore shall pluckThe eagle of the sea!Oh, better that her shattered bulkShould sink beneath the wave;Her thunders shook the mighty deep,And there should be her grave;Nail to the mast her holy flag,Set every threadbare sail,And give her to the god of storms,The lightning and the gale!

    americanrepublic:

    Old Ironsides
    Oliver Wendell Holmes

    Ay, tear her tattered ensign down!
    Long has it waved on high,
    And many an eye has danced to see
    That banner in the sky;
    Beneath it rung the battle shout,
    And burst the cannon’s roar;—
    The meteor of the ocean air
    Shall sweep the clouds no more.

    Her deck, once red with heroes’ blood,
    Where knelt the vanquished foe,
    When winds were hurrying o’er the flood,
    And waves were white below,
    No more shall feel the victor’s tread,
    Or know the conquered knee;—
    The harpies of the shore shall pluck
    The eagle of the sea!

    Oh, better that her shattered bulk
    Should sink beneath the wave;
    Her thunders shook the mighty deep,
    And there should be her grave;
    Nail to the mast her holy flag,
    Set every threadbare sail,
    And give her to the god of storms,
    The lightning and the gale!

    classicmoviescenes:

    The match cut is a cut between two shots which match graphically. This match establishes a sense of continuity and interconnectedness between two different spatial or temporal spheres.

    Psycho (1960), directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

    Lawrence of Arabia (1962), directed by David Lean.

    The Graduate (1967), directed by Mike Nichols.

    2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), directed by Stanley Kubrick.

    (via synathroesmus)

    "So many of us choose our path out of fear disguised as practicality"

    (Source: embraceyourboing, via ktshy)

    I do want the source on this.

    I do want the source on this.

    (Source: shippyfairy)

    generalharrison:

Harrison family members with pet goat in front of the Executive Mansion.
Perhaps the most famous photograph of daily life at President Harrison’s Executive Mansion. Russell Harrison holds his daughter Marthena’s hand behind the family collie, Dash. Benjamin “Baby” Harrison McKee and his sister Mary Dodge are mounted upon a cart, attached to Old Whiskers, the family pet goat.
Old Whiskers was a cantankerous thing. On one occasion he broke loose down Pennsylvania Avenue with grandkids in tow, and President Harrison had to chase after them, waving his cane and shouting. He rescued the cart before the children came to any harm. It made the papers, and remains a lively story about “The Gay Nineties.”
Photograph courtesy of the Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site.

Goat cart!

    generalharrison:

    Harrison family members with pet goat in front of the Executive Mansion.

    Perhaps the most famous photograph of daily life at President Harrison’s Executive Mansion. Russell Harrison holds his daughter Marthena’s hand behind the family collie, Dash. Benjamin “Baby” Harrison McKee and his sister Mary Dodge are mounted upon a cart, attached to Old Whiskers, the family pet goat.

    Old Whiskers was a cantankerous thing. On one occasion he broke loose down Pennsylvania Avenue with grandkids in tow, and President Harrison had to chase after them, waving his cane and shouting. He rescued the cart before the children came to any harm. It made the papers, and remains a lively story about “The Gay Nineties.”

    Photograph courtesy of the Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site.

    Goat cart!

    ausonia:

Drew Carey is turning into the old man from Up.

    ausonia:

    Drew Carey is turning into the old man from Up.

    After experiencing the beauty of traveling throughout this region, where men and women work and raise their families, where children play and the elderly dream, I now find myself here, in this place, able to say only one thing: War is madness.

    Whereas God carries forward the work of creation, and we men and women are called to participate in his work, war destroys. It also runs the most beautiful work of his hands: human beings. War ruins everything, even the bonds between brothers. War is irrational; it’s only plan is to bring destruction; it seeks to grow by destroying.

    Greed, intolerance, the lust for power — these motives underlie the decision to go to war, and they are too often justified by an ideology; but first there is a distorted passion or impulse. Ideology is presented as a justification and when there is no ideology, there is the response of Cain: ‘What does it matter to me? Am I my brother’s keeper?’ War does not look directly at anyone, be they elderly, children, mothers, fathers. ‘What does it matter to me?’

    Above the entrance to this cemetery, there hangs in the air those ironic words of war, ‘What does it matter to me?’ Each one of the dead buried here had their owns plans, their own dreams, but their lives were cut short. Humanity said, ‘What does it matter to me?’

    Even today, after the second failure of another world war, perhaps one can speak of a third war, one fought piecemeal, with crimes, massacres, destruction. In all honesty, the front page of newspapers ought to carry the headline, ‘What does it matter to me?’ Cain would say, ‘Am I my brother’s keeper?’…

    …Here lie many victims. Today, we remember them. There are tears, there is sadness. From this place we remember all the victims of every war.

    Today, too, the victims are many. How is this possible? It is so because in today’s world, behind the scenes, there are interests, geopolitical strategies, lust for money and power, and there is the manufacture and sale of arms, which seem to be so important!

    And these plotters of terrorism, these schemers of conflicts, just like arms dealers, have engraved in their hearts, ‘What does it matter to me?’ It is the task of the wise to recognize errors, to feel pain, to repent, to beg for pardon and to cry.

    With this ‘What does it matter to me?’ in their hearts, the merchants of war perhaps have made a great deal of money. but their corrupted hearts have lost the capacity to cry. That ‘What does it matter to me?’ prevents the tears. Cain did not cry. The shadow of Cain hangs over us today in this cemetery. It is seen here. It is seen from 1914 right up to our own time. It is seen even in the present.

    With the heart of a son, a brother, a father, I ask each of you, indeed for all of us, to have a conversion of heart; to move on from ‘What does it matter to me?’, to tears: for each one of the fallen of this ‘senseless massacre’, for all the victims of the mindless wars, in every age.

    Humanity needs to weep, and this is the time to weep.

    Pope Francis, homily at Sacrario Militare di Redipuglia, Redipuglia, Italy, September 13, 2014.

    (I just needed to post this again.)

    (Source: deadpresidents)

    whataboutbobbed:

    Marie Prevost in a sitting she did for Charles Gates Sheldonfor the September 1925 issue of Photoplay magazine

    shirttailsup:

    Is it bad that I think several world leaders from the last ~150 years are remembered only because they’re photogenic?

    historical-nonfiction:

    The pilot episode of “I Love Lucy” was lost for decades. In the early 1980s, the Museum of Broadcasting decided to go looking for it. They were unsuccessful until, in 1989, a copy was found under the bed of the late Pepito Perez who played a clown in the pilot episode. Pepito’s widow, Joanne Perez, had read about the long-lost pilot in TV Guide, recalled that her husband had been given a copy, and checked under their bed

    (Source: tvobscurities.com)

    retrocampaigns:

Same
Via the Doris A. and Lawrence H. Budner Theodore Roosevelt Photograph Collection, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University

I’m DJ Teddy and I’m here to say, American Empirialism’s the only way
I said the oooooooooonly way.
Big stick!

    retrocampaigns:

    Same

    Via the Doris A. and Lawrence H. Budner Theodore Roosevelt Photograph Collection, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University

    I’m DJ Teddy and I’m here to say, American Empirialism’s the only way

    I said the oooooooooonly way.

    Big stick!

    ausonia:

Jet Pack Costume

    ausonia:

    Jet Pack Costume

    ausonia:

That car has one of the biggest spoilers I’ve ever seen!

    ausonia:

    That car has one of the biggest spoilers I’ve ever seen!