Lunchtime doubly so.

Spelunking the depths of Popular Culture
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  • retrocampaigns:

    "Our World in Review:" Through the Camera Eye
    America’s Hall of Fame: Presidents of the United States

    This scholastic series of short films produced by Pathe News was evidently in multiple parts, but the only one I can find in the National Archives is Reel III, McKinley through Roosevelt.

    I’m separating this into two posts: today is William Mckinley through Woodrow Wilson, and tomorrow is Calvin Coolidge through Franklin Roosevelt (who was President at the time this film was created, 1930/1931).

    Via the National Archives, todaysdocument

    jernmulern:

    Happy Earth Day!

    (via nbcsnl)

    jonnovstheinternet:

    So I heard it’s Earth Day

    image

    (via historyofjasmine)

    phoenix-falls:

malformalady:

Wisconsin snow storm versus flooding in Ireland

Ireland isn’t fucking around with the sealing capabilities of their doors

    phoenix-falls:

    malformalady:

    Wisconsin snow storm versus flooding in Ireland

    Ireland isn’t fucking around with the sealing capabilities of their doors

    (via jedilunawinchester)

    et11obsessions:

Clara Bow, flapper, with hamburger sammich and Coke.

    et11obsessions:

    Clara Bow, flapper, with hamburger sammich and Coke.

    histpix:

First-Known Photograph of Presidential Inauguration, 1857
This is an extremely rare photograph of Inauguration of James Buchanan, the 15th President of the United States. 

    histpix:

    First-Known Photograph of Presidential Inauguration, 1857

    This is an extremely rare photograph of Inauguration of James Buchanan, the 15th President of the United States. 

    Fellow-citizens: Clouds and darkness are around him; His pavilion is dark waters and thick clouds; justice and judgment are the establishment of his throne; mercy and truth shall go before his face! Fellow-citizens! God reigns, and the Government at Washington lives.

    James A. Garfield (1831-1881), calming a mob angry at news of President Lincoln’s death, from the balcony of the New York customs-house.

    Quoted in The Presidents of the United States, 1789-1914: James A. Garfield by William Walter Phelps, Ed. by James Grant Wilson

    ourpresidents:

President Nixon and Bob Hope playing golf in the Oval Office.  4/20/73.

    ourpresidents:

    President Nixon and Bob Hope playing golf in the Oval Office.  4/20/73.

    (Source: facebook.com)

    (Source: dulcet-waffles, via bossypants)

    retrocampaigns:

Gerald Ford sucking back that sweet tobacco at a desk in the study of the president of the University of Alabama, April 13, 1978.  Ford was a big-time pipe smoker, and even had a pipe in his hand for his presidential portrait. Ford smoked for decades, until one day … According to Robert Barrett, the Army Military Aide to Ford during his presidency and later Ford’s Chief of Staff, it was Ford’s daughter Susan who convinced him to give up tobacco.

We’re sitting in the office out in Rancho Mirage and he says in his totally ineffective way as far as Susan’s concerned, “Well, you know, Susan, I’m pretty concerned about the fact that you’re smoking.” And Susie being this snippet little thing that she is, she’s great, she says, “Well, Daddy, I’ll stop smoking cigarettes if you stop smoking pipes.”  He got up from his chair, he went over, – I bet you the collection, I don’t know, but it has to be worth a quarter of a million dollars. I mean, there were ivory pipes and every head of state and every time he went somewhere, he got another pipe. He gathered up all the pipes in the office, there were a bunch of them there. Got a box from the conference room in the office out in Rancho Mirage. All the pipes. Leaves, goes all over the house. Takes all the pipes, calls Penny in and says, “Send these to the museum.” Last time he smoked a pipe. Forty-two years smoking a pipe and he stopped, like, on a dime.

And in case you were wondering, according to Susan, he was a
Field and Stream
man.
William Stanley Hoole Special Collections Library, University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections

    retrocampaigns:

    Gerald Ford sucking back that sweet tobacco at a desk in the study of the president of the University of Alabama, April 13, 1978.

    Ford was a big-time pipe smoker, and even had a pipe in his hand for his presidential portrait. Ford smoked for decades, until one day …

    According to Robert Barrett, the Army Military Aide to Ford during his presidency and later Ford’s Chief of Staff, it was Ford’s daughter Susan who convinced him to give up tobacco.

    We’re sitting in the office out in Rancho Mirage and he says in his totally ineffective way as far as Susan’s concerned, “Well, you know, Susan, I’m pretty concerned about the fact that you’re smoking.” And Susie being this snippet little thing that she is, she’s great, she says, “Well, Daddy, I’ll stop smoking cigarettes if you stop smoking pipes.”

    He got up from his chair, he went over, – I bet you the collection, I don’t know, but it has to be worth a quarter of a million dollars. I mean, there were ivory pipes and every head of state and every time he went somewhere, he got another pipe. He gathered up all the pipes in the office, there were a bunch of them there. Got a box from the conference room in the office out in Rancho Mirage. All the pipes. Leaves, goes all over the house. Takes all the pipes, calls Penny in and says, “Send these to the museum.” Last time he smoked a pipe. Forty-two years smoking a pipe and he stopped, like, on a dime.
    And in case you were wondering, according to Susan, he was a
    Field and Stream
    man.

    ourpresidents:

    Who’s on your All-Time All-Star baseball team? Listen in on a President’s picks!

    During a June 22, 1972 press conference, journalist Clifford Evans asked President Richard Nixon to name his favorite baseball players. President Nixon quickly listed a few key players, but Evans pressed him, “Mr. President, as the nation’s number-one baseball fan, would you be willing to name your all-time baseball team?” Asking for time to prepare a thoughtful response, President Nixon created lists of his choices for All-Time All-Star baseball teams, which were distributed via the Associated Press on June 30.

    On June 30, Evans returned to the White House to interview President Nixon in the White House for RKO General Broadcasting. This meeting was captured by recording devices in the Oval Office.

    In this conversation segment, President Nixon explains the process, methodology, and rationale for building his all-star teams.

    -from the Nixon Library 

    (Source: facebook.com)

    thingsamylikes:

    gameraboy:

    "A Sticky Situation" (1960) by Carl Barks

    Daisy tells it like it is.

    (via aestheticallychallenged)